Sessions & Presentations

Line Up and Presentations

Main stage events, cultural performances, special workshops, plus 70 hands-on sessions—see what what NCLC13 was all about. Look for this icon

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to access the slides used during the conference. Please note that not all sessions had slides, and not all speakers were able to share the slides for copyright or other reasons. (If you presented and wish to share your presentation, please email us.)

Keynote videos, when available, are embedded below. Photos from the 2013 NCLC are online here.

Jump to: April 7 | April 8 | April 9

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Sunday, April 7

2:00 PM
  • Exploring China’s Cultural Dynamism Through Documentary Film
    The opportunity to learn about Chinese culture is an aspect of course work that many students find motivating. This session will support teachers in introducing elements of Chinese culture and history through film, a form to which students are particularly receptive. Carma Hinton will use excerpts from her classic films such as Small Happiness and Morning Sun to illustrate ways that scenes can engage students and prompt inquiry. Primary Source staff will pair her clips with selections from documentaries about contemporary China to make the point that Chinese culture is anything but stagnant. A listeff of classroom-friendly documentaries as well as feature films will be provided, and participants will be invited to share ways that they have used films to enhance their language courses or to bolster China-related curriculum in other contexts in their schools. With Deborah Cunningham, Peter Gilmartin, Carma Hinton. 
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  • Creating Engaging Teaching Materials for 21st-Century Assessments
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    Many Chinese class curricula attempt to pursue a communicative approach but, in reality, they stress vocabulary and dialogue memorization at the expense of meaningful communication. The presenters have developed a set of criteria for creating materials that fit the communicative model. They will present the criteria and lead the participants in an evaluation of exercises to see how they measure up against the criteria; then, they will assist the participants in deciding if the materials are truly communicative in form. Participants will also learn how to create 21st-century assessments that are communicative in nature and that assess all three modes of communication. Finally, participants will form small groups and develop sample materials that fit the communicative model and then share their materials with other groups. With Carol Chen-Lin, Janice Dowd, Lucy Lee. 
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  • Engaging Chinese Language Students Through STEM
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    Maryland was the only state to receive federal Race to the Top funding to support world language programs. In this session, a panel will provide background information on Maryland’s World Languages Pipelines project that was designed to establish new Arabic, Chinese and Spanish dual language programs in elementary classrooms in the state. Presenters will describe the unique collaborative process of developing content-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) curriculum modules for students that align with the National Standards for Learning Languages as well as national content standards in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Presenters will highlight essential components and share samples of the curriculum modules and lessons. Participants will discuss how these modules can be adapted for use in multiple Chinese program designs and across grade levels. With Ruby Costea, Shuhan Wang. 
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  • Criteria and Practices of College-Level Chinese Placement and K–16 Articulation
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    Clear descriptions of student performance are fundamental for K–16 articulation in language learning. Placement criteria and practices of four-year colleges differ; therefore, the panel will look into how three college-level institutions place Chinese learners who have previous Chinese experience into Chinese classes. Participants will learn about different aspects of placement criteria, such as the ACTFL 5 C’s or in-house guidelines or rubrics, language-learning skills or integrated skills, and pragmatic competence. The panel will also solicit the K–12 participants’ input regarding the instructional goals of their highest-level Chinese classes, as well as the postsecondary participants’ input regarding their placement practices. With Hua Dong, Jin Zhang. 
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  • Building International Programs: A Road Map
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    As of 2012, hundreds of Chinese students are studying in New England high schools. From public schools in the far corners of northern Maine to schools in the Greater Boston area, schools in this region have experienced a dramatic cultural shift over the past five years because of the influx of Asian students on their campuses. Building a successful international program, however, involves a lot more than simply recruiting students. In this interactive session, participants will explore the characteristics of a successful international program. Some of the cultural challenges that schools face and what can be done to strengthen existing programs will be addressed. The presenter will share her insights from working with schools across New England on the “Road Map for the Successful Integration of Chinese Students” and provide a lively forum for sharing information and success stories. With Suzanne Fox. 
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  • Examining Reading the Writing Across Levels
    The panel will discuss different methodologies and strategies used to teach reading and writing to learners of varying levels through the examination of three papers: “Teaching Authentic Reading a tMiddlebury Summer Program: Perspectives and Approaches” (Chen), “Integrating Newspaper into an Advanced Low Heritage Class: Strategies and Thoughts” (Liang), and “Teaching Reading and Writing to Elementary Level Students” (Wan). Participants will examine the differences between teaching authentic reading material and “textbook reading” and the pedagogical principles and strategies that could be adopted. The panel will also discuss newspaper-reading strategies and provide participants with a guideline to design a newspaper-teaching curriculum. Finally, the panel will introduce the systematical approach used at Harvard Extension School to teach characters to first-level students. With Tong Chen, Min-Min Liang, Min Wan. 
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  • China’s Economic Rise and Current Landscape
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    Since Deng Xiaoping’s economic reform, China has achieved amazing economic development. With growth rates averaging 9.5 percent over the past 30 years, China has been the fastest-growing major economy and is the world’s second-largest economy after the United States. However, together with such success, China is facing new challenges and crises of a different sort. This session will explore the current economic landscape in China, as well as the growing imbalances facing the country: between rapid economic progress and stagnant political reform; between the rich and poor; between economic growth and environmental protection; between urban and rural communities. Participants in this session will explore new lessons in China on the World Stage: Weighing the U.S. Response, see a clip of scholar video and discuss best practices for engaging students in debate of what the rise of China means for the United States. With Amy Howland, Wanli Hu. 
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  • Storytelling and Technology in the Chinese Language Classroom
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    Cognitive science has shown that the human brain learns through stories, not logic. Storytelling is a powerful way to spark creativity, meaningful conversation and collaboration in the classroom.Technology has presented us with new, dynamic ways to tell stories: video, eBooks, “picture stories” and more. Through carefully scaffolded, standards-based units, students learn the skills needed to tell their own stories in the target language. The panelists will briefly touch on the theoretical basisfor using storytelling in the classroom. They will share examples of culturally based, linguistically appropriate stories developed to meet the linguistic and cognitive needs of students in the Chinese classroom. Participants will watch video stories, self-dubbed movie clips and narrated stop-action videos created by high school students as part of the cross-school “Rock That Movie” competition. Finally, participants will learn strategies on how to help students tell their own stories. With Robin Harvey, Bing Qiu, Frank Lixing Tang, Xuan Wang. 
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  • Learning by Doing
    A student-centered classroom is a characteristic of Teaching Through Problem Solving, Teaching Through Inquiry and Teaching Through Inductive Thinking. Such a student-centered classroom is essential to the success of student learning. However, it is very challenging for teachers to apply and maintain such a learning environment on a daily basis. The presenters will demonstrate effective instructional activities to motivate and engage students’ interactions in Chinese. Examples of active learning, cooperative learning and inductive teaching and learning will be provided. The participants will be able to practice these activities during the session. Students’ works and video clips, as well as classroom management tips and strategies, will be highlighted. With Hong Chen, Yan Wang. 
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  • Immersion Programs: What Works and What Needs to Improve
    Waddell Language Academy (WLA) is a K–8 urban public school located in Charlotte, N.C.,where a full Chinese language immersion program was established in 2006. After seven years of implementation, its immersion program has become a well-known, highly successful, full Chinese language immersion program. The presenters will share their experiences of initiating, building and structuring a Chinese program, and also discuss how their program is sustained through delivering well-articulated, content-rich instruction in Chinese in K–6 settings. Participants will learn how WLA implemented its Chinese language immersion program and examine its development process, as well as the collaboration from its supportive components, such as parents and teachers. Participants will also review the academic performance data; from this, they will determine what has worked and what needs to improve. Finally, the participants will discuss sustainability and improvements for an immersion program. With Shoufen Jacobson, Ynez Olshausen, Yanhong Ye. 
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3:15 PM
  • Effectively Building Study Abroad into the University Chinese Curriculum
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    Summer study abroad programs in most Chinese programs at U.S. universities are typically viewed as extracurricular components, with a focus on exotic Chinese foods and vacation-like tourist trips, rather than opportunities for rigorous academic training and career preparation. The panel will present an effective model for integrating academically rigorous study abroad learning experiences from beginning to advanced levels that include structured service learning into the regular university Chinese curriculum. Participants will learn how to efficiently build the study abroad curriculum into a constant, continuous and recurring part of a Chinese program at the college level. They will also explore effective methods for how to conduct learning activities in local communities and how to help students participate in local social life so that they will acquire guided firsthand cultural experiences. Finally, the panel will share proven strategies for motivating students to continue their Chinese learning through study abroad. With Xiaobin Jian, Xizhen Qin, Eric Shepherd. 
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  • Using Traditional Chinese Arts to Support Chinese Language and Cultural Studies
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    In this collaborative, hands-on workshop, presenters will share strategies for teaching Chinese language, history and culture through traditional Chinese arts across the K–12 spectrum. Chinese traditional arts such as Chinese bronze, ceramics, calligraphy and jade all carry profound cultural representations that can convey a deep cultural understanding. When Chinese classes introduce culture and history in an in-depth manner, language learners acquire global and cultural proficiency. In small groups, participants will be given “road pointers” on how to “read” Chinese artworks and work together to interpret the “stories” behind them; then they will discuss ways to convey those meanings to American students — in English or in Chinese. Participants will become familiar with the very best Web-based resources and technology tools to teach Chinese traditional arts. They will leave with new knowledge and resources for immediate use in their classrooms. With Jingjing Jiang, Huajing Maske, Susan Zeiger. 
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  • Best Practices in Chinese Language Assessment K–16
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    Participants will learn about the latest trends and best practices in Chinese language assessment and discuss implications for their own program or classroom contexts. Classroom assessment can provide insight on how to improve teaching and learning, and can also be used for program advocacy, improvement, and expansion. Presenters will discuss innovative Chinese language resources, including computer and face-to-face assessments, as possible models for assessment. Participants will learn how these assessments align with best practices in foreign language instruction, and will explore their applications to multiple contexts, from kindergarten to adult education. With Na Liu, Lynn Thompson. 
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  • Starting and Sustaining Chinese Immersion Programs in Urban and Rural Settings
    In this session, participants will learn the beginning steps of planning, marketing, implementing and sustaining immersion programs in two distinctly different settings: the first is an urban magnet school in Houston, Texas, and the second is a kindergarten classroom in the rural community of Greenville, Mich. Participants will learn how each team met the common challenges of first-year implementation, including developing and maintaining district-level stakeholder support, meeting state certification requirements, developing appropriate curriculum with meaningful assessment of student achievement, and evaluating program effectiveness. Participants will be provided resources, presentation slides and the opportunity to have a dialogue with the presenting teams — representative of teachers, building administration and district administration. With Christina Aguirre-Oliva, Brian Bordelon, Diane Brissette, Kristin Mier, Xin Li. 
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  • Chinese Characters: Incorporating Best Practices
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    This session presents research-guided best practices in Chinese character instruction and illustrates how to incorporate character instruction in a standards-based curriculum in grades K–16. Its findings were developed in the 2012 STARTALK program involving K–16 master teachers of Chinese and top researchers in foreign language acquisition and Chinese literacy. Research shows that successful character learners go well beyond the rote memorization of characters, utilizing various recurring parts within characters to facilitate recognition and production. In this session, the panel will demonstrate how to use this information to create student-centered activities for character learning, and how to incorporate these skill-building activities in communication-focused, standards-based units. Participants will design lessons and activities that develop character literacy and incorporate authentic materials. They will also learn how to implement activities incorporating characters that involve interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. With Kevin Chang, Yea-Fen Chen, Claudia Ross. 
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  • Using and Creating Digital Textbooks at Beginner Levels
    The presenters will share their experience transitioning Mandarin 1 and 2 classes into paperless classrooms, with instruction centered on the iPad, using existing digital Mandarin e-textbooks and adapting iPad apps for Mandarin use, as well as creating an iBook digital textbook using iBooks Author. Emphasis will be placed on how the apps, websites and e-textbooks can enrich instruction in the classroom and streamline the learning process from the perspective of both teacher and student. Presenters will also address the paradigm shift that comes with digitizing a classroom: classroom management, trust issues with plagiarism and “flipping the classroom” to focus more on one-on-one time in the classroom setting. With MingJung Chen, Sushu Xia. 
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  • Math in Chinese Immersion Classrooms: Increasing Student Language Output
    Student target language output in Chinese immersion classrooms is essential to student success in achieving higher proficiency levels in both the language and the content. The Chinese dual language immersion programs in Utah are discovering and developing new ways to increase student language output during math instruction. Utah’s Chinese dual language immersion teachers are experiencing greater success in math instruction, and students are learning important social language through the innovative use of programs like Every Day Counts Calendar Math, and a special emphasis on incorporating story problems in daily math lesson planning. These changes in math instruction have proven essential in the classroom, as both Chinese dual language immersion teachers and their students address the higher-level thinking requirements that are embedded in the new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. With Tessa Dahl, Sandra Talbot. 
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  • Maximize Students’ Engagement Through Storytelling and Brain-Friendly Activities
    In this session, the presenter will explain the neuroscience behind storytelling and demonstrate how to engage students through brain-friendly techniques such as gesturing, acting, pantomiming, personalization and illustration, all of which are essential components of successful storytelling. Participants will have opportunities to participate in all of the activities above (e.g., coming up with an effective gesture for an essential phrase, or thinking of ways to use pantomime to effectively review and retell a story). With Haiyun Lu. 
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  • The 3S Partnership: Developing Strong, Significant and Sustainable Sister-School Partnerships 
    Participants will learn key insights into developing a prospering partnership that allows for sustainability and growth in the future. Presenters from North Carolina, New Hampshire and Massachusetts will share their experiences from successful teacher and student exchanges between schools in the U.S. and China, as well as the dynamics and logistics of initiating and maintaining a strong sister-school relationship. Attendees will engage with presenters and their peers in creating a viable plan of action for pursuing new, or for reviving old, partnerships. With Meredith Cargill, William Gurney, Lisa Justice. 
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  • Exchanges that Enhance: How Teachers from China Enrich Your Classrooms and Community
    Hosting a teacher from China not only offers a staffing solution to help schools start or expand their Chinese programs, but also provides a unique opportunity for cultural exchange in your local classrooms. Long before your students may have the chance to go abroad, they can experience daily interaction with a native speaker who brings authentic cultural ideas and resources with them. The presenters will highlight strategies and examples of how visiting teachers from China can enrich a Chinese program. Additionally, participants will learn useful strategies and tips to make hosting a successful experience for the students, teacher and local community. With Selena Cantor, Wang Jiuping, Zhou Zhichang. 
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4:30 PM
  • Opening Plenary and Reception: Celebrating Chinese Language Teachers and Students
    The sixth National Chinese Language Conference is a celebration of many things, but at its heart it is a celebration of learning and the teachers and students who engage each day in the process. Join us for an insightful and engaging conversation with Chinese language teachers, and hear from their students about what makes them so special. We will hear from veteran teachers that have made major contributions to the field and from newer teachers that have created meaningful and motivating experiences for their students. As part of the kickoff of the sixth National Chinese Language Conference, join us in saluting the synergies between teacher and student that propel the field forward and create the foundation for both globally aware, globally competent students and a strong, sustainable U.S.–China relationship far into the future. Introduced by Robert Davis, Executive Director, Chinese Language and Culture Initiatives, The College Board.  Speakers: Jianhua Bai, Professor of Chinese, Kenyon College, OH; Lucy Chu Lee, Chinese Language Teacher, Livingston High School, NJ; Xin Li, Chinese Language Teacher, Walnut Hills Elementary, Greenville, MI; Heidi Steele, Language Teacher, Peninsula School District, WA. Moderated by Christopher Livaccari, Director, Chinese Language Initiatives, Asia Society. Performance by Medfield Jazz Band and Guest Artist Yang Ying. Closing remarks by Kathleen Ennis, Advisor, Primary Source. Location: Salons E – G, fourth floor.
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Monday, April 8

8:45 AM
  • China Across Subject Areas: The Career ConnectionAs more and more U.S. students develop high levels of proficiency in Chinese, it becomes ever more necessary to understand the connections between Chinese language learning, other academic content, and career and professional development. It is simply not enough to learn the language or engage with the culture. Students must integrate the study of the Chinese language with a broader vision for their academic and professional interests and their long-term career goals. The participants in this panel are leading voices in the field who have worked with students at all levels to broaden and deepen their understanding of and engagement with China, and to connect language learning with the development of other critical skills. We will hear from representatives of fields and perspectives as diverse as archaeology, engineering and business, and explore the ways in which learning Chinese is helping students to create new and exciting career trajectories. Introduced by Julia de la Torre, Executive Director, Primary Source. Moderated by Sara Judge McCalpin, President, China Institute in America. Speakers: Sigrid Berka, Executive Director, International Engineering Program, University of Rhode Island; Der-lin Chao, Director, Chinese Flagship Program, Hunter College, City University of New York (and President, Chinese Language Teachers Association); Robert E. Murowchick, Director, International Center for East Asian Archaeology and Cultural History, Boston University. Location: Salons E – G, fourth floor.
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10:00 AM
  • “Fifth Core” Mandarin Chinese Language and Cultural Program: Get Started!
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    Oxford Community Schools’ Fifth Core Mandarin Chinese Language and Cultural Program is the largest fluency-based world language program in Michigan, with more than 2,200 K–12 students in their program. Each year, Oxford’s Chinese world language program grows by more than 200 students. It is imperative that students not only learn a world language, but also the skills to acquire additional fluency in other world languages when needed. In this presentation, participants will learn about Oxford Community Schools’ strong mission for all students to become fluent in a world language and to gain global competence. They will learn how to replicate the execution plan to enable their students to become fluent in the Mandarin Chinese language and culture, and they will learn about Oxford’s strategies to make their Mandarin Chinese language program financially sustainable for all students. With William Skilling. 
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  • Improving Language Performance with Effective Assessments
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    Clear instructional targets and assessments of performance help teachers and learners focus on the key elements that will improve language performance. By examining a model unit of instruction, participants will learn how to create performance assessment tasks that lead learners to demonstrate what they can do in Chinese while providing feedback on how to improve. Participants will experience and analyze strategies to assess students’ ability to read, listen and view with deeper understanding; exchange information and express opinions; and create written, spoken or multimedia presentations. With Paul Sandrock.  
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  • Using Performance Tasks to Improve Proficiency in the Chinese Immersion Classroom
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    Effective formative assessment practices empower students and teachers to attain high levels of academic performance. The Chinese immersion classroom is no exception. Reflecting upon lessons learned over the past several years in trying to increase Mandarin language proficiency in a K–12 Mandarin immersion program, a panel consisting of a district immersion specialist, an elementary school teacher/curriculum specialist and a secondary level teacher/curriculum specialist from Portland Public Schools will share its process for setting proficiency targets, training teachers in effective assessment practices and developing specific classroom strategies and assessments for increasing proficiency outcomes K–12. Participants will be engaged in discussions about setting ACTFL-aligned, proficiency-based outcomes; developing specific instructional strategies for improving proficiency; and using curriculum-embedded performance tasks to generate higher outcomes. With Michael Bacon, David Kojo Hakam, Yin Shen. 
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  • FLES Language Acquisition Through Story-Based Curriculum
    The challenges of delivering Chinese language classes to young students via video conferencing have inspired this team to focus intently on curriculum and pedagogy that engage all students in the target language and that help build communication skills and cultural awareness. Story-based units have proven to be the most effective. Through examples of unit plans and curricular materials, participants will observe how careful sequencing facilitates teaching in the target language, allows for spiraling content (helps new students), includes Common Core content and articulates novice through intermediate low levels. The panel will share video clips and highlight the perspectives of students, parents, Chinese teachers, classroom facilitators, curriculum developers and the school. Participants will learn a method of designing and sequencing units and lesson plans for Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES) Chinese that effectively engages young children, facilitates teaching in the target language and results in measurable language acquisition. With Chang Liu, Crystal May, Sheree Willis.  
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  • Chinese Students in U.S. Schools: A Discussion on Admission and Support Strategies
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    The significant increase of undergraduate students from China provides opportunities for U.S. colleges and universities to assess their readiness to support Chinese students inside and outside of the classroom. This session will focus on partnerships between the admission office and other key campus offices to support Chinese undergraduate students. With Diane Anci, Matt McGann, James Montoya.  
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  • Using Virtual Media to Teach About China at the Secondary Level
    Engaging students in learning about political, philosophical and social aspects of Chinese history and culture is a challenge at the secondary school level. This workshop introduces various strategies that utilize visual media to help educators access a greater understanding of Chinese culture and history. With the popularity of the graphic novel as an effective tool to hook students, cartoons and graphic representations can be used in a meaningful way to engage students. This session will introduce two specific approaches: one that uses cartooning as a means of understanding Confucian ideas and one that utilizes postcards as a visual source for students to explore their understanding of China and other places. The workshop allows participants to engage interactively and have hands-on experiences with classroom-friendly materials. With Seth Kirby, Angela Lee. 
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  • Math + Chinese = Better Math Scores — Why?
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    In the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Programme for International Student Assessment, published in 2010, it was found that Chinese students outperformed U.S. students in math. Liping Ma, renowned mathematics scholar, mentions that Chinese students have held consistently high mathematic achievement for many years (1999). Students in Chinese immersion classes in the U.S. also achieve high math scores. What are the reasons behind these conclusions? The presenters will focus their discussion on how and why math performance is higher under a Chinese immersion setting. They will highlight approaches to teaching Chinese math, concept sequences, materials and learning expectations. In addition, the presenters will introduce Chinese linguistic features in mathematical language, such as the word “twenty” in English versus “two-ten (二十)” in Chinese. Participants will learn about the possible reasons behind high mathematic achievement when the subject is studied in Chinese, as well as Chinese math teaching strategies in immersion programs. With Tingting Mei, Ping Peng, Jing Zhao. 
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  • Lesson Planning: From Paper to Practice
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    Transforming a well-designed lesson plan into the classroom is often a challenge. Drawing from STARTALK’s experience in observing summer language programs, the presenter will introduce tools that facilitate the development and implementation of effective lesson plans, which are based on current research on how students process information. The presenter will begin with a brief overview of the principles and steps of backward design, focusing on applications for lesson planning. Annotated video clips of actual classroom instruction will further exemplify solid methods on how to transform lesson plans for effective classrooms. Participants will learn how the principles of backward design apply to lesson planning. They will receive a lesson plan template based on backward design principles, along with a checklist of critical items that provide evidence of successful instruction. Participants will also share in small group discussions on challenges and successes of various strategies. With Betsy Hart, Myriam Met. 
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  • Integrate Radicals into Chinese as a Foreign Language Curriculum
    This panel will address a critical issue in the teaching and learning of Chinese characters: the lack of utilization of radicals in the current Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) curriculum. Our preliminary survey shows that radicals are grossly underutilized due in part to a lack of training and a lack of resources. Through a carefully designed college course on radicals and many other examples, the presenters will demonstrate that radicals play a critical role in improving students’ grasp of Chinese characters and in strengthening their reading and writing skills in Chinese. Participants will leave with a better understanding of the semantic structure of Chinese characters and their evolution. They will also get the resources they need to start their own self-training and to begin integrating radicals into their CFL curriculum. With Weijia Huang, Levente Li, Mingquan Wang. 
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  • Short-Term Summer Camp and Winter Camp of the Confucius Institute Headquarters
    This session will introduce the objectives and activities of the Chinese Bridge Summer Camp for U.S. high school students, and the Chinese Summer/Winter Camp, as well as share information and experiences from the Confucius Institutes and Confucius Classrooms. With Chen Mo, Frank Phillips, Holly Chen Tyson. 
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11:15 AM
  • Immersion Program: Strategic Planning for Sustainability and Growth
    In the current cost-cutting climate, elementary foreign language programs are undergoing challenges  in trying to sustain healthful support from districts and communities. This presentation will discuss  the critical tools of strategic planning that will ensure sustained growth. Panelists will encourage  participants to look into strategies and processes that will build and sustain resources for their  language immersion programs. Participants will survey and exchange approaches and practices by  analyzing the urgency of specific situations and by generating a guiding coalition. They will identify a  vision, a mission and core values, and will learn how to communicate their vision and to consolidate  short-term wins. Finally, participants will develop an action plan for continued growth. Examples and  worksheets will be provided. With Mary Cazabon, Vivian Tam, Gerald Yung. 
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  • “China into the 21st Century”: An Interdisciplinary Approach
    Since 1926, as a nonprofit organization based in New York with a mission to advance a deeper  understanding of China, the China Institute strongly believes that the teaching and learning of  Chinese language and culture cannot be separated. In this session, the panel will illustrate how  its professional development programs for K–12 educators across all subjects implement an  interdisciplinary approach to effectively integrate the teaching of Chinese art, culture, history,  social studies and language around the theme of “China into the 21st Century.” The China Institute’s  own experiences in the field will help participants learn how to form productive interdisciplinary  collaborations, for which a different approach toward planning and managing needs to be thought  through. With Kevin Lawrence, Shenzhan Liao, Yan Shneider. 
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  • Qualifications Beyond Teacher Proficiency
    This presentation addresses an imperative issue in Chinese language instruction: the quality of  Chinese teachers. As the number of Chinese language teachers increases rapidly, it is apparent that  certain teachers, with or without teacher certificates, lack an understanding of the U.S. education  system and the Chinese language itself. At the micro level, Chinese teachers need to understand  the U.S. education system and know about effective approaches in order to function in local  schools. Chinese teachers, native speakers or not, should have a solid command of the Chinese  language and should consciously improve their own language use and study of Chinese pedagogical  grammar, including syntax, semantics, phonology, discourse analysis and etymology. In this session,  participants will analyze the expectations of the U.S. work environment and share resources for  professional development. With Baozhang He, Juefei Wang. 
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  • Providing Feedback to Student Writers: Written Commentary and Individual Conferences
    This session discusses teacher feedback to college-level Chinese learners’ texts — both written  feedback and one-on-one conferences. In the first part, participants will examine how teachers  facilitate student learning through manipulating the amount of control conveyed through written  commentary. Variables examined will be focus, specificity and mode (Straub, 1996, 1997), and the  issues addressed will include area of focus, explicitness of corrective feedback, directness of speech  and the use of praise and criticism. In the second part, the presenters will demonstrate how spoken  interactions at conferences allow time for students to actively participate in negotiation of meaning,  eliminate mutual misunderstandings and clarify teachers’ written responses. The participants  will acquire knowledge about the pedagogical roles and constraints of writing conferences, the  principles of conducting teacher–student conferences and some social aspects of a conference  approach. They will review related research, share their instructional practices and engage in handson  activities using authentic student writings. With Mushi Li, Ying Zhang. 
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  • Unveiling the K–16 National Chinese Standards
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    In the past five years, a group of K–12 and postsecondary Chinese educators have worked closely  and created 13–16 progress indicators for each of the 11 standards within the 5 C’s, as well as  formed examples and two scenarios for each of the 5 C’s. These scenarios have been field tested  by K–16 Chinese educators and were well received by both learners and instructors. Participants in  this session will learn about the new K–16 national Chinese standards and how the K–16 Chinese  project has redefined K–16 articulation. Through a series of tasks in theme-based learning scenarios,  all stakeholders will have a clearer understanding of the knowledge and capabilities of students  at each level. Defining articulation by standard-based tasks will help Chinese educators assist all  learners to achieve and maintain a higher proficiency, which in turn will improve the sustainability of  our Chinese programs. With Jianhua Bai, Carol Chen-Lin, Dali Tan. 
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  • Next Steps for Our Chinese Language Students: Study In and About China at the University Level
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    In this session, panelists will draw from Boston University’s programs of study to demonstrate the  continuity of experiences available to students who are already interested in China and the Chinese  language. Members of the panel will explore the breadth of programs available for such students at  the university level in the following areas: the value and rationale of study abroad in China (in this  case, Shanghai), Chinese language study and subject areas, and the resources of the Center for the  Study of Asia. A student will speak about his experience in transitioning from high school to college  and then to Shanghai in pursuit of his interests. Participants will leave with an understanding of what  opportunities lie ahead for their China-interested and Chinese-proficient college-bound students. With Joe Fewsmith, Weijia Huang, Charlotte Mason,  Debra Terzian, Lee Veitch. 
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  • “We Need Chinese Teachers!” A Panel with Partner Schools
    In this session, presenters from multiple institutions — including a Chinese teacher certification  program and two local K–8 language immersion schools — will focus on their collaborative work  in shaping the Chinese language education community and will showcase classroom-tested  approaches based on principles of L2 teaching methods. Participants will find ways to develop  dynamic partnerships that will support and lead them to success in L2 teacher training. They  will also compare and contrast different teaching scenarios that examine best practices and  challenges. By the end of the session, participants will not only interpret how teaching principles are  demonstrated in the classroom, but also take away effective L2 teaching strategies and innovative  approaches to teaching and learning. They will also receive tips on classroom management that  include some activities in student-centered instruction, examples of creativity in Chinese language  teaching, hands-on resources for delivery of instruction and successful class procedures in Chinese  language classrooms. With Jeanne Cobb, Donnette Dais, Alice Zhang. 
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  • Using Structured Language Activities to Build Chinese Proficiency
    Building proficiency in Chinese requires students to be confident about communicating in Chinese in  a variety of situations. Participants will learn practical strategies and activities that allow students  to practice their language skills through safe, engaging interactive activities that promote structured  language growth. They will learn how to structure language practice activities that foster studentto-  student interaction and teacher-to-student interaction. These activities can be incorporated into  daily instruction in both immersion and non-immersion world language programs to increase Chinese  proficiency and content knowledge. With HsiuWen Hsieh, Yu-Ju Tai, Kathleen Wang. 
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  • Technology in the Chinese Classroom: Creating a 21st-Century Learning Space
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    This session will address the educational benefits of using technology and social media to create a  fun language-learning environment. Participants will learn how to use easily accessed technology  (e.g., Prezi, Animoto, iMovie, Voki) to create theme-based projects and detailed rubrics that engage  students and make Chinese relevant to their daily lives. Participants will also look at examples of  how teachers in the Chinese classroom have used Twitter and Facebook to supplement language  education. They will explore how both Twitter and Facebook stimulate students to use language in  different ways, as well as learn how to use these sites to encourage students to have authentic and  meaningful interactions with people in their Chinese community. With Amy Chang, Qi Li, Haiyun Lu, Elizabeth Tredeau. 
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  • Create a Schoolwide System Through Professional Development
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    Starting in 2011, the Chinese American International School (CAIS) has been on an arduous journey  to reform its curriculum and to integrate language arts and the content areas taught in Chinese and  English. Working with two groups of renowned national experts, faculty members of CAIS have  engaged in intense, focused and purposeful professional development in establishing a curricular  framework, designing and implementing model units and lessons, and conducting action research  and collecting students’ work for evidence-based assessment. This process has transformed  teachers’ relationships and broadened their perspectives about what a dual language immersion  school means. Presenters will share the process, the sample products and the key elements crucial  to creating such a schoolwide system. Participants will learn strategies they can use in a similar  transformative endeavor. With Kevin Chang, Shuhan Wang. 
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12:30 PM
  • Equity and Access in Chinese Language EducationAs the U.S.–China relationship becomes ever more important, and interest in Chinese language learning continues to grow across the United States, it has never been more critical to offer opportunities for Chinese language learning to new and diverse populations of students, including rural, urban and underserved communities. The participants in this panel have all been at the forefront of broadening access to Chinese language learning and have used the study of Chinese — in different geographic, social and cultural contexts — as a lever for the development of students’ global competence, self-confidence, academic and career success. This discussion is both a celebration of what is possible and an exploration of best practices for increasing access and equity in Chinese language education. How do Chinese language learning and educational exchanges with China fit into a broader agenda of increasing students’ engagement with the world? How are schools, districts and states integrating the study of Chinese with the learning of other world languages, support for English language learners, and engagement with other cultures and societies in the U.S. and worldwide? Education leaders from a number of different states will share their perspectives on and experiences with these critical issues facing the field. Speakers: Marcos Aguilar, Executive Director, Semillas Community Schools, Los Angeles; Nicole Boudreaux, World Language Specialist, Lafayette Parish School System; Roger F. Harris, President, CEO, and Superintendent, Boston Renaissance Charter Public School Foundation; Gregg Roberts, World Languages and Dual Immersion Specialist, Utah State Office of Education Moderated by Anthony Jackson, Vice President for Education, Asia Society. Performance by “Voices of Renaissance” Choir. Location: Salons E – G, fourth floor.
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2:30 PM
  • Developing an Advanced Content-Based Technical Chinese Course for Engineers
    Research shows that the ability to interpret and discuss professional topics is a defining characteristic of global professionals and of advanced-level language proficiency. In this session, participants will learn how to prepare engineering students to become global professionals through this innovative interdisciplinary course in Chinese. The panelists will show how to adapt the University of Rhode Island’s Chinese Language Flagship curriculum for the particular needs of engineering students. A blended advanced technical Chinese learning model, which combines an in-class and an online course module that is co-taught and designed by a language professor and an engineering professor, provides students with college-level, authentic academic content to maximize their Chinese learning. Interwoven with the academic or professional instruction in the target language, this is a proven way to present language in natural contexts that enhance and maximize language learning (Curtain & Pesola 1994; Genesee 1994). With Wayne Wenchao He, Wen Xiong, Zongqin Zhang. 
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  • Rhyme It! Act It! Speak It!
    The integration of motivation, imagination, movement and emotion vastly accelerates language acquisition and enhances greater internalization and comprehension. This spirit-lifting session offers participants a much-needed resource filled with engaging and practical classroom-tested activities that promote rapid language acquisition and are appealing to all students. The presenters will engage participants in a rhythmic, action-packed, hand-clapping, toe-tapping sensory explosion that will lead to deeper understanding of the values and benefits of using rhymes and TPR in teaching Chinese. They will demonstrate how to use rhymes and TPR to wake up a sleeping class, help students absorb and retain more information, and get the most uninterested students to become interested. Participants will leave with fresh ideas and ready-to-use resources that capture and hold students’ interest, reinforce their knowledge, strengthen their language skills and encourage them to be active learners. Please come join us and get ready for a thrilling rhythmic and musical experience that is 100 percent on task. With Lijia Chen, Jian Gao, Ting Gao.
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  • K–5 Reading Strategies that Work
    Getting students to read at their grade level can be challenging in a Chinese immersion environment. Participants will learn about the strategies Chinese immersion teachers use to help their students read on-grade-level texts. The presenters will introduce a variety of strategies that are taught through direct instruction and show how students use these strategies when they read. Participants will not only see videos of the instructional lessons, but will learn about the different stages that the students went through in successfully using the strategies. Some of the strategies to be discussed are word context cues, homophone awareness, morphemic structures, visual-orthographic patterns, the role of syllable awareness, and bottom-up and top-down strategies (e.g., skipping, rereading, using picture clues, previewing and identifying main ideas). Participants will also receive a list of valuable research articles that led to the strategies introduced to the students. With Maquita Alexander, Elizabeth Hardage, Pearl You. 
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  • Selecting and Applying Mentor Texts to Enhance Proficiency and Interaction
    This session will help Chinese immersion teachers select and apply authentic printed and online materials such as mentor texts that will enhance content knowledge and language skills and stimulate critical thinking skills. This instructional approach was successfully applied in an innovative language and literacy curriculum in the Chinese immersion program of Cambridge Public Schools. The “mentor text” approach is based on the Literacy Collaborative instructional design for best practices in English language and literacy teaching and learning in grades K–8. This framework also connects immersion students’ learning experience with the Common Core State Standards and ACTFL’s 5 C’s. Participants will examine how this critical framework integrates the range of reading, writing and word study activities essential for promoting literacy. They will also review the book selection process and leave this session with valuable printed and online resources for authentic children’s literature in Chinese. A wiki will be included to enhance continued discussion. With Szu-Ming Li, Vivian Tam, Kai Tan. 
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  • Enough with the Cookie-Cutter Travel Book Itineraries: Student Exchange Should Feature Authentic Experience
    With technology bringing more learning possibilities to students while they remain in their chairs, exchange programs that take students abroad must take full advantage of the notion of “only here and only now.” Spending extensive time with peers in China, experiencing daily life “on the ground,” and managing essential tasks in Chinese can create far more powerful learning opportunities than are possible on standard student tour programs. Furthermore, integrating the precise linguistic tasks required during an exchange experience into the curriculum at home lends authenticity to classroom learning. This presentation introduces a number of strategies for implementing exchange programs that challenge students to co-create a unique and individualized experience. As an example, we will look at an innovative U.S.-China high school exchange program aimed at authentic learning that leads students to greater linguistic and cultural proficiency. With Heidi Steele, and student representatives Sophia Anderson, Jack Chakerian, Caitlin Dougherty. 
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  • AP Chinese Language and Culture: Strategies for Success
    This session addresses three areas of need in AP® Chinese instruction and assessment: enhancing discourse-level learning, improving student performance in interpersonal writing and presentational speaking on the AP Exam, and meeting the needs of diverse learners. Presenters will provide comparative data on AP Chinese Exam scores from 2007 to 2012. The data will show that, over a period of six years, students demonstrated consistently diminishing performance in email responses and cultural presentations than in other parts of the exam. The data will also show that the performance of test-takers in the standard group needs to be improved, which can provide the impetus for continued growth of this group. Working in groups, participants will practice using the suggested strategies and models to develop discourse-based learning activities, as well as differentiated instructional activities in a thematic approach to enable students with dissimilar backgrounds to learn in the same AP Chinese class. With Cecilia Chang, Richard Chi. 
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  • How to Prepare K–12 Students for Success in a College Chinese Program
    This session is a forum where K–12 teachers can become familiar with all the essential information that will help students eventually succeed in Chinese at the college level. Participants will have opportunities to interact with representatives from the Chinese Language Teachers Association (CLTA) on all aspects of college Chinese language programs. Presenters will discuss course systems and language requirements and the options with minors, majors and study abroad programs, as well as information regarding AP credits, proficiency levels and general standards. They will give an overview of CLTA and its various programs and opportunities, address college-level Chinese programs in both private and public institutions, and discuss K–16 articulation. Finally, there will be a Q&A session to encourage group discussions. With Der-lin Chao, Yea-Fen Chen, Hongyin Tao. 
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  • Chinese Proficiency Test and Interactive Online Live Class
    The Chinese Proficiency Test is a basic index to assess proficiency in the language. The rapid development of technology has enabled education to transform learning — and how we measure it — in new ways. Language teaching and assessment delivered in innovative ways present new opportunities and benefits for teachers and students in North America. Through live demonstrations, the speakers will illustrate the Chinese Proficiency Test, the Internet-based Chinese Proficiency Test, an interactive teaching/learning platform, and the Confucius Institute Online. With Lawrence Gu, James Connor. 
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  • Leveraging STARTALK Resources and Impact
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    Presenters will discuss lessons learned from the STARTALK project and will focus on identifying and meeting the needs of Chinese language teachers. Best practices developed in STARTALK will be described, and instructional resources to support these principles will be demonstrated and shared. Participants will work in small groups to develop a wish list of additional resources to support classroom teachers and learners. STARTALK’s impact on increasing access to Chinese programs will also be presented, and case studies for building Chinese language courses into the schools will be shared and discussed. There will be time for small groups to brainstorm on what strategies will work best in their individual communities. Participants will provide their recommendations on how STARTALK can best meet their needs in the future. With David Ellis, Betsy Hart. 
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  • Pedagogical Techniques to Reinforce Discourse Competence in Oral Proficiency
    Development for Intermediate Learners of ChineseStudies have shown that discourse competence is a core component in communicative competence development. Yet this is not emphasized sufficiently in second language acquisition. Alternately, ACTFL-speaking proficiency guidelines require intermediate learners to produce loosely connected sentences in their spoken text. For the intermediate–high levels, ACTFL indicates that cohesive and coherent discourse should emerge in speakers’ utterances. The presenter’s project is designed to improve intermediate learners’ oral proficiency with an explicit focus on discourse competence, so as to increase the emphasis on discourse competence teaching; hence, the learners can create comprehensible unified spoken texts at the discourse level and meet the ACTFL criteria. In this session, the presenter will provide general guidelines for adapting activities to improve discourse competence in the three genres of discourse: narration, description and comparison. Participants will learn 10 activities that aid development of discourse competence in the three genres. With Yuan Liu. 
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3:45 PM
  • Integrating the Study of Chinese Language, History and Culture into a Strategic Vision for the Future
    In this session, participants will learn about the Newton Public Schools integration of the study of Chinese and China with a strategic vision for 2020. The workshop will focus on the Newton Beijing Jingshan School Exchange Program and the Global Communities Program. The Global Communities Program is a three-year, interdisciplinary, smaller learning community focused on developing engaged global citizens in grades 10–12. The Newton Beijing Jingshan School Exchange Program is the first student exchange program between the U.S. and China. With Michael Kozuch. 
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  • Learning Chinese and Understanding Chinese Culture Through an Interdisciplinary Approach
    An interdisciplinary model of Chinese teaching enhances student acquisition of Chinese and substantive content learning. To enhance teaching effectiveness and achieve best learning outcomes, different subjects such as the arts (music, dance, painting, calligraphy), social studies (geography, history), and math and science (STEM) provide vital content in Chinese lessons and help develop students’ interest and further their curiosity about Chinese language and culture. Participants will learn how to successfully integrate the study of Chinese language with basic math (Chinese abacus and the symmetrical beauty of garden architecture) and science (animals and plants) skills to promote students’ understanding of the Chinese language, content and culture. With Yunping Jian, Min Qin , Mo Zhang. 
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  • Take Me into Communities and the World — with Chinese!
    When students have rich input directed toward completing a meaningful project, they are naturally hooked and engaged. This is especially true when Chinese language is not just a subject of study, but also a vehicle for communication, for exploring content and culture and for engaging with local and global communities. The presenters will share a curricular framework that is thematically organized, standards and performance based, and product oriented. Participants will see student work and curricular examples illustrating the principles of understanding by design, story form and outcome-driven assessment. Through interaction and discussion, participants will learn strategies and steps for designing and implementing project-based language learning and teaching. With Chiachyi Chiu, Mei-Ju Hwang, Shuhan Wang.
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  • Ensuring Advanced-Level Proficiency in Immersion
    How can we ensure that immersion students increase their language proficiency each year they are in the program? How can we ensure that graduates of immersion programs demonstrate the levels of proficiency required for advanced-level study in college, or for future participation in the global workforce? Immersion programs, beginning at the kindergarten level, often fail to address these critical questions and subsequently struggle to produce students with high proficiency levels. This session will highlight immersion programs that have tried to answer these questions. Specifically, participants will examine how setting proficiency targets at each grade level, aligning curriculum and instruction to those targets, and utilizing regular formative and summative assessment practices can significantly impact proficiency development. This backward design approach, along with the ongoing examination of student work, can lead programs to significant improvement in language proficiency outcomes for students. With Michael Bacon, Myriam Met. 
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  • Pragmatic Competence: Developing Real-World Communication in the Target Language
    The goal of second language acquisition is to speak appropriately and to communicate effectively. Appropriateness of using L2 is determined by a learner’s pragmatic competency — a vital part of overall language competence. Bachman (1990, p. 87) believes that pragmatic competence includes illocutionary competence and sociolinguistic competence. Pragmatic competence is a speaker’s ability to combine grammatical interpretation of an utterance with its speech act, and sociolinguistic competence indicates a speaker’s ability to perform language functions in appropriate ways according to context and real-world settings. The focus of this session will be on how to develop these two competencies within the domain of overall communicative competence and how to develop the ability to speak appropriately and communicate effectively in various real-world settings. Participants will learn how to design communicative tasks and classroom activities for enhancing performance in real-world communication. With Rui Feng, Meiru Liu, Lina Lu, Iris Xu. 
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  • Integrate, Differentiate and Assess Mandarin Language Development in Immersion
    Language immersion teaching requires skills in integrated curriculum development and language attentive instruction. Yet, explicit models demonstrating what these skills look like are lacking. During this session, participants will learn about a third-grade unit — Designing Model Membranes — originally created as part of the Boston Museum of Science’s Engineering is Elementary curriculum and now redesigned with permission by the Minnesota Mandarin Immersion Collaborative curriculum team. First, the facilitators will highlight the new language planning frameworks designed to support teachers’ ability to integrate, differentiate and assess Mandarin language development within the context of subject learning. Then the participants will work in small groups to analyze model lessons, experience firsthand how to use the planning frameworks and identify the role of interaction with the group. They will also learn how to access the unit and the supporting materials online so that they can adapt and use them in their programs, replicate the language-enhancing learning activities and draw from language-integrating frameworks. With Tara Fortune, Molly Wieland. 
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  • Yes, You Can Start an Independent, Nonprofit Immersion School!
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    Nationwide, innovators have established Chinese immersion programs in a variety of settings. However, these programs are concentrated in large cities and in states with progressive language policies. How can access to Chinese immersion programs be more equitable for students throughout the country? One viable option is to establish a network of independent, nonprofit Chinese immersion schools that have the flexibility needed to develop a schoolwide curriculum that matches the unique profile of the host community, thus becoming a valued community asset. Participants will learn how to establish an independent, nonprofit immersion school in their region and how to be invited to participate in a network of such schools. Topics will include Meeting Incorporation and Charter Requirements, Managing a Nonprofit Board, Applying for 501(c)(3) Status, Developing a Business Plan, Running a Capital Campaign, Accessing Grants, and Establishing Partnerships. Members of established schools are welcome to join us and share their experiences. With Margaret (Peggy) Sharkey. 
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  • Creating a Scaffolded, Free Reading Program for Chinese
    This session will discuss some research-derived principles for building an effective reading program and demonstrate a variety of reading activities for Chinese that encourage students to read a wide range of materials for pleasure. Included will be examples of classroom activities, as well as activities and materials that belong in a reading room setting, where students can explore at their own pace. Participants will be invited to contribute toward a growing archive of reading materials freely available to the field. With Cynthia Ning. 
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  • Integrating Common Core Content Standards into Chinese Language Instruction
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    In 2010, Kentucky was the first state to adopt the Common Core in English/language arts and mathematics. In order to collaborate with classroom teachers and to make the Chinese program more sustainable, we integrated the Common Core State Standards into the Chinese classroom. In this workshop, the presenter will share examples of ways to integrate language arts, math, science and the arts. Participants will discover how to use technology, storytelling and hands-on activities to reinforce Common Core Content Standards. Although ours is an FLES program, the immersion strategies adopted work very well to maximize the use of the target language in the classroom. This session will be presented in Chinese only. With Yan Wang. 
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  • Assessment Type: Which One?
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    There are numerous ways to assess student outcomes. However, there is often a misalignment of assessment type, purpose and desired outcome. In this session, the presenter will review the differences between test and prompt types, scoring methods and test uses as they relate to desired outcomes and learning objectives. This presentation will be the most useful to teachers in communicative, student-centered classrooms who have minimal formal background or training in the principles and best practices of language assessment. Participants will learn how to correctly align assessment type with desired learning outcomes to maximize achievement in the K–12 Chinese classroom. With David Ellis. 
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5:00 PM
  • Gala Evening Featuring Winners of the International Chinese Bridge Competition

    National Chinese Language Conference. Hear perspectives on the importance of world languages education and U.S.–China educational exchange from leaders in the field. Chinese American comedian Joe Wong will offer some refreshing insights on language, culture and communication in both the U.S. and China. This evening celebration of Chinese language learning will also include performances by a group of outstanding U.S. students who have achieved high levels of proficiency in Chinese — and taken their talents onto Chinese television to win top prizes at the international Chinese Bridge Competition. Since 2001, nearly one million Chinese language learners across the globe have participated in preliminary rounds of the competition — so these young learners’ achievements are truly extraordinary! This is the U.S. premiere of this special performance. This evening’s celebration of Chinese language learning will also include performances by a group of outstanding U.S. students who have achieved high levels of proficiency in Chinese. Speakers: Joseph E. Aoun, President, Northeastern University; David Coleman, President, The College Board; Deborah S. Delisle, Assistant Secretary of Education for Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education; Henrietta H. Fore, Co-Chair, Board of Trustees, Asia Society; Xu Lin, Director-General, Hanban/ Confucius Institute Headquarters; Hao Ping, Vice Minister, Ministry of Education, People’s Republic of China. Performance by winners of the International Chinese Bridge Student Competition. Emcee: Joe Wong. Location: Salons E – G, fourth floor.
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Tuesday, April 9

8:45 AM
  • Vocabulary Teaching and Learning: From the Beginning Level to the Advanced Level
    Vocabulary learning needs to be given more attention over a longer period of time if learners are to achieve an advanced level of proficiency. This is especially important because pedagogy needs to enhance depth of knowledge as well as vocabulary size (Schmitt, Jiang & Grabe 2011). Participants will learn about empirical studies that illustrate how 700 characters help to accelerate vocabulary learning; they will also learn how to teach difficult words by increasing the depth of vocabulary knowledge and how to develop strategies for teaching Chinese vocabulary. The panel will highlight research-based key principles of effective strategies about vocabulary learning and teaching to help students increase the number of words they know, to expand what they know about each word and to process words automatically in order to attain an advanced level of Chinese. With Jianxin Cui, Rui Ma, Wen Xiong. 
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  • Cultural Intangibles that Impede the Success of Certificated Foreign Teachers
    In recent years, high-quality training has been invested in the certification of Chinese teachers, yet many are still struggling in our classrooms. Intangible factors, not covered in any certification course, make it difficult to transition into the American classroom. Why? Could cultural notions of efficiency, practicality and priorities adversely impact foreign teachers and affect administrative evaluations? Presenters will share the insights from six years of STARTALK teacher certification projects and point out the specific invisible intangibles facing foreign teachers. In this session, the presenters will briefly describe the Critical Language Teacher Certification Program, where teacher candidates who are successful in acquiring certification are often unsuccessful in U.S. classrooms due to intangibles such as differing work ethos. Participants will then discuss possible solutions to the scenarios of difficulties that newly certificated teachers of Chinese face. With Margaret Chow, Betty Lau. Location: Salons C – D, fourth floor.
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  • From High School to College: How to Improve the Articulation of Chinese Language Learning
    This panel will present the collaborative work of university and secondary teachers of Chinese in surveying their respective students on their learning experiences, expectations and proficiency at different programs. The survey focused on finding some of the best practices in strengthening articulation throughout the language learning sequences across different programs. Participants will learn the dos and the don’ts in developing a curriculum that best supports the smooth transition from a secondary-level to a college-level Chinese program. With Hua Dong, Xiaodong Zhao, Xiaoyang Zhou. \
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  • Capturing China’s Transformation Through Photography and Visual Media
    China’s current economic and industrial growth is staggering in pace and complexity, and the U.S.–China relationship has emerged as perhaps the single most important factor for ensuring global stability and prosperity. Teachers should be bringing real-world issues such as economic development and environmental challenges into the classroom to engage students more broadly. The session will introduce China Air Daily, an expansion of the earlier Beijing Air, which provides a stunning and compelling visual tool where anyone in the world can “see” the air quality in cities across China and the United States on a daily basis. NASA’S daily satellite images from space add an extra perspective of these regions. The session will also generate ideas on how this may be the basis of some exciting and innovative learning projects. With Michael Zhao. 
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  • Language Leaper: Facilitating Early Language Learning with Interactive Media/Blended Delivery
    Having trouble staffing an articulated K–12 Chinese program? See how West Virginia, a small rural state, uses a blended FLES model, combining a FLAP-funded DVD program and native speakers. Language Leaper, an interactive, content-related, media-based program, uses best practices for early language learning and is facilitated by a trained classroom teacher with little or no previous Chinese language skills. A trained native speaker reinforces the language through face-to-face and virtual experiences. During this session, participants will explore the history, rationale, goals and assessment data of the program. In addition, participants will experience a Language Leaper lesson and will have the opportunity to hear from native speakers involved in the language learning process. With Debora Nicholson, Hong Shu. 
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  • Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competence: The Key to Success for Chinese Language Teachers
    For teachers of Chinese, cross-cultural competence (CCC) is vital to the success of their classroom instruction and a meaningful life experience. A solid foundation in CCC skills can improve a teacher’s performance in the classroom and often includes cultural competence with both the dominant and minority populations in China and the U.S. Based on his experience with K–12 teachers of Chinese in Florida and Ohio since 2006 and his field research in western China in June 2012, the presenter will use examples to argue that CCC skills are often more important than other skills and should receive the same attention as other areas of training, such as pedagogy and content knowledge, especially for new/guest teachers from China. Participants will learn about various ways to enhance CCC for teachers of Chinese and its importance in teachers’ professional development. With Kun Shi. 
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  • Understanding China’s Education System and Youth Culture
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    According to the 2009 PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) ranking for reading, science and math, Shanghai students ranked number one in all three subjects, while American students ranked 17th, 23rd and 31st, respectively. At the same time, Chinese students are coming to study in U.S. high schools and universities in double the numbers over the past five years. How do we understand these facts and explain in our classrooms the differences between the two education systems and the school experiences of this generation? In this session, participants will learn the resources and the ways to teach American students about Chinese language and culture through the lens of their Chinese peers’ education and school experiences. They will also learn how this content can be used across disciplines when Chinese culture and language are introduced to students, and how to use this knowledge to better guide and design exchanges with Chinese schools. With Kongli Liu. 
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  • Chinese T.R.E.A.T.S. for Pre-K and Young Learners
    How can you teach the youngest of learners in a way that will help grow and sustain your Chinese program? Participants will learn the keys to doing just that, through T.R.E.A.T.S .: technology, resources, engaging activities, talk, talk, talk (communication) and sustainability strategies. Two experienced teachers will share ideas, strategies and resources used to make the youngest of students excited about learning Chinese. Participants will learn ways to use the target language 98 percent of the time in a non-immersion school environment. They will see how just 20 minutes once or twice a week with this age group can make a huge impact when best practices are followed. They will not only see pictures and videos, but also leave with a list of great technology resources for this age group. In addition, they will receive new songs, games and activities to engage this age group. With Elizabeth Hardage, Jin Ji. 
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  • Leveraging Business and Government to Develop Chinese Language Education
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    The presenters will discuss the Rhode Island Roadmap to Language Excellence and its implications for the future of Chinese language education in the state of Rhode Island. Rhode Island was the sixth state to develop a Roadmap to Language Excellence, a process developed and sponsored by the Language Flagship to bring together stakeholders from business, government and education to assess, define, discuss and find solutions to the demand for language proficiency in the state. This presentation will describe the Roadmap process and its results and will include strategies for engaging corporate and government leadership to advocate for and improve Chinese language programs at the K–16 level. With Sigrid Berka, Erin Papa. 
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10:00 AM
  • Designing and Implementing Effective Chinese Language Immersion Programs
    Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to learn from a panel of experts consisting of program administrators and curriculum specialists from well-established Chinese immersion programs. First, panelists will discuss characteristics of their programs that represent different models (e.g., 90/10, 50/50). Participants will then join roundtable discussions relating to program design and implementation, where they will find answers to the following questions: What goals might immersion programs set? How do programs design curriculum and instruction? What assessments can be used, and for what purposes? In what subjects is Chinese the medium of instruction? What does the research say about student achievement in English and math when the instruction is in Chinese? How does a program articulate language study from elementary through middle and high school? What Chinese orthographic script should be taught? What are the criteria for materials selection and development, and what materials are available? How do programs recruit and retain teachers, and what professional development should be provided? Is there a network of immersion schools in which different stakeholders may seek and exchange information, resources and expertise? With Maquita Alexander, Michael Bacon, Sue Berg, Kevin Chang, Elizabeth Hardage, Luyi Lien, Joy Kreeft Peyton, Eric Schneider, Shuhan Wang, Pearl You. 
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  • Best Practices in Chinese Language Assessment
    The primary focus of this workshop will be on the K–8 formative assessments, the Student Self- Assessment and the Teacher Observation Matrix of the Center for Applied Linguistics. Participants will also learn about CAL’s two summative assessments: the Early Language Listening and Oral Proficiency Assessment and the Student Oral Proficiency Assessment. The presenters will use materials specifically designed for teachers of Chinese. Participants will come away with ideas for creating both formative and summative assessments for their program. With Na Liu, Lynn Thompson. 
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  • Developing Literacy and Communication Through Chinese Language Instruction
    Learning another language is an excellent means to develop the literacy skills of the Common Core State Standards. Developing and assessing the three modes of communication help learners acquire literacy skills through the strategies practiced in each mode. Examine means to model and practice improving understanding, accessing information, clarifying meaning, exchanging ideas and applying writing processes with your students. As schools across the U.S. implement the Common Core State Standards, learn how your Chinese language courses support and further the objectives of the Common Core. With Paul Sandrock. 
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  • Teacher Swap Shop
    This year’s Teacher Swap Shop, co-hosted by CLASS, provides an opportunity for teachers and educators to exchange practical classroom activities and materials in an interactive, informal setting. First, several experienced Chinese teachers will share classroom-tested activities and resources in a series of mini-presentations. Afterward, participants will share their own activities and materials with other teachers at their tables. Tables are organized by topics, and participants were invited to register their activity ideas in advance. Everyone is welcome to join this hands-on session and encouraged to bring their own activities, materials and classroom tips to share with others. With Grace Chang, Xin Li, Meggie Chou, Wei Liu, Jie Shao, Lucy C. Lee, Na Liu, Louise W. Zhu, Ye Sun, Meiching Chang, Wen-Tsui Pat Lo, Marisa Fang, Tingting Mei, Christopher Young. 
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  • Technology Forum
    This forum offers an opportunity to experience innovative technology tools and approaches firsthand, as well as to exchange ideas on how to integrate these tools into one’s own classroom. In a series of mini-sessions, presenters will highlight technology tools that can help increase students’ language proficiency and skills. Afterward, a Q&A panel discussion will focus on ways to integrate and use technology in the classroom, and an “idea wall” will be used to demonstrate backchannel technology and to engage participants. With Tsan-Jui Cheng, Xinjia Peng, Tina Wu. 

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  • NECLTA Colloquium on Chinese Language Acquisition Research: What Every Teacher Should Know
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    Join researchers and teachers from the New England Chinese Language Teachers Association (NECLTA) for this engaging presentation of the latest research on Chinese language learning, with summaries of current advances in the teaching of grammar, pronunciation, Chinese character literacy and reading in both K–12 and higher education. Although not every teacher has to be a researcher, every teacher needs a basic appreciation and understanding of what research can tell us about how students learn and the best practices in designing and delivering instruction. This session will focus on important studies and data that can inform classroom teachers’ practice and the design of K–16 Chinese language programs and that can be used when presenting the effectiveness and the benefits of Chinese language learning for students to administrators or school boards. With Cecilia Chang, Baozhang He, Wayne Wenchao He, Lung-Hua Hu, Claudia Ross. 
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12:15 PM
  • The Future of Education in China and the United States
    China is on the move — both in its education system and the economy. With China’s rapid expansion of education and with Shanghai’s stunning success on the 2009 PISA assessments, educators around the world have begun to look to China as a model of educational excellence. While many here look to the successes of China’s education system, many Chinese educators are looking at other countries — including the United States — for examples of how to foster innovation, creativity and critical thinking while educators in both nations are dealing with many common challenges. How do we achieve equitable education for all students? How do we transform low-performing schools? How do we develop teachers and leaders of the highest quality? How do we prepare our students to be successful in an increasingly complex, globally connected world? Join leading education policymakers from the U.S. and China in this lively conversation about how these two education systems are learning from each other and creating solutions to these common challenges. Speakers: Kai-ming Cheng, Professor and Chair of Education, University of Hong Kong; Deborah S. Delisle, Assistant Secretary of Education for Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education; Jonathan Landman, Assistant Commissioner for Teaching and Learning, Massachusetts Department of Education; Yin Houqing, Director General, Shanghai Education Commission. Moderated by Vivien Stewart, Senior Advisor for Education, Asia Society. Location: Salons E – G, fourth floor.